The Art Of War Quotes for Business Owners

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The Art Of War Quotes for Business Owners

Great Quotes for Business Owners.

"The Art Of War" by Sun Tzu.

From the pages of The Art Of War                                           

This is proven wisdom. Learn and apply his methods.

        

The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one's deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.         

These are: (I) The Moral Law; (2) Heaven; (3) Earth; (4) The Commander; (5) Method and discipline.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

The Moral Law causes people to be in complete accord with their ruler, so that they will follow him regardless of their lives, undismayed by any danger.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

Heaven signifies night and day, cold and head, times and seasons.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

Earth comprises distances, great and small; danger and security; open ground and narrow passes; the chances of life and death.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

The Commander stands for the virtues of wisdom, sincerity courage and strictness.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

By Method and discipline are to be understood the marshalling of the army in its proper subdivisions, the gradations of rank among the officers, the maintenance of roads by which supplies may reach the army, and the control of the military expenditure.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

This five heads should be familiar to every general: he who knows them will be victorious; he who knows them not will fail.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.


The next point is a really good basis in which to compare any company with its competition. Keep this conditions always in mind so that you can grow stronger.

Therefore, in your deliberations, when seeking to determine the military conditions, let them be made the basis a comparison, in this wise:

(I) Which of the two sovereigns is imbued with the Moral Law?

(2) Which of the two generals has most ability?

(3) With whom lie the advantages derived from Heaven and Earth?

(4) On which side is discipline most rigorously enforced?

(5) Which army is the stronger?

(6) On which side are officers and men more highly trained?

(7) In which army is there the greater constancy both in reward and punishment?

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

 Enhance points 4 by uploading policies to your organization and make them available and followed by everyone in your team without excuses. Enhace point 6 by making sure every position has all the information governing their jobs accesible and up to date and point number 7 using OrgBoat's reports and commendations system.

All warfare is based on deception.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

If he is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strenght, evade him.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.

Chapter I - Laying Plans.

In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns.

Chapter II - Waging War.

Hence to fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting.

Chapter III - Attack by Statagem.


This are five essentials for victory.

(I) He will win who knows when to fight and when not to fight.

(2) He will win who knows how to handle both superior and inferior forces.

(3) He will win whose army is animated by the same spirit throughout all its ranks.

(4) He will win who, prepared himself, waits to take the enemy unprepared.

(5) He will win who has military capacity and is not interfered with by the sovereign.

Victory lies in the knowledge of these five points.

Chapter III - Attack by Statagem.


In war, then, let your great object be victory, not lengthy campaigns.

Chapter II - Waging War.

To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himslef.

Chapter IV - Tactical Dispositions.

Security against defeat implies defensive tactics; ability to defeat the enemy means taking the offensive.

Chapter IV - Tactical Dispositions.

What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease.

Chapter IV - Tactical Dispositions.

Sun Tzu said: The control of a large force is the same in principle as the control of a few men: it is merely a question of dividing up their numbers.

Chapter V - Energy.

Sun Tzu said: Whoever is first in the field and awaits the coming of the enemy, will be fresh for the fight; whoever is second in the field and has to hasten to battle, will arrive exhausted.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Therefore the clever combatant imposes his will on the enemy, but does not allow the enemy's will to be imposed upon him.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Appear at point which the enemy must hasten to defend; march swiftly to places where you are not expected.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

You can be sure of succeding in your attacks if you only attack places which are undefended. You can ensure the safety of your defence if you only hold positions that cannot be attacked.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Hence that general is skilfull in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skilfull in defence whose opponent does not know what to attack.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

You may advance and be absolutely irresistible, if you make for the enemy's weak points; you may retire and be safe from pursuit if your movements are more rapid than those of the enemy.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

And if we are able thus to attack an inferior force with a superior one, our opponents will be in dire straits.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

The spot where we intend to fight must no be made known, for then the enemy will have to prepare against a possible attack at several different pointsl and his forces being thus distributed in many directions, the numbers we shall have to face at any given point will be proportionately few.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Knowing the place and the time of the coming battle, we may concentrate from the greatest distances in order to fight.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Thought the enemy be stronger in numbers, we may prevent him from fighting. Scheme so as to discover his plans and the likelihood of their success.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

Rouse him, and learn the principle of his activity or inactivity. Force him to reveal himself, so as to find out his vulnerable spots.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

He who can modify his tactics in relation to his opponent and thereby succeed in winning, may be called a heaven-born captain.

Chapter VI - Weak Points and Strong.

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Art_of_War